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Milestones

Milestones are scientifically-supported behavioral or physical checkpoints seen in infants and children as they grow and develop. All of our developmental milestones are validated by American Academy of Pediatrics findings.

Abilities

Abilities are additional skills your child should be developing. When reviewing abilities, look at your child’s overall behavior to gauge their progress.

It’s Important to Remember:

Be sure to adjust for prematurity. If your child is missing any milestones, be sure to talk with your healthcare provider.

Missing one or two abilities should not cause alarm, as every child develops differently. However, if they are missing multiple abilities, be sure to talk with your healthcare provider.

Use our checklists to track your baby’s development and discuss any concerns with your healthcare provider.

Learn About Early Detection & Early Intervention

Make Sure Your Baby Has Met Prev. Milestones

Motor

Milestone

Key Milestones

  • Walks independently and seldom falls
  • Squats to pick up a toy
  • Stacks two objects or blocks
Act early by talking to your healthcare provider if your child:
  • Unable to take steps independently
  • Poor standing balance, falls frequently
  • Walks on toes
  • Doesn’t pull to stand
  • Can’t crawl to climb stairs
  • Doesn’t use pincer grasp (thumb and forefinger) to hold small objects

13 to 18 Month Old - Motor Milestones to Look For

The 13-18 month motor milestones video shows parents and caregivers examples of motor milestones children should reach by 18 months old.

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Sensory

Milestone

Key Milestones

  • Helps with getting dressed/undressed
  • Has a regular sleep schedule
  • Eats an increasing variety of foods
Act early by talking to your healthcare provider if your child:
    • Overly sensitive or completely unaware of stimuli like loud noises and different textures
    • Doesn’t enjoy being cuddled or touched by parents
    • Becomes upset when dealing with certain textures
    • Shows unusual level of fear whenever feet are lifted off of the ground

13 to 18 Month Old - Sensory Milestones to Look For

The 13-18 month sensory milestones video shows parents and caregivers examples of sensory milestones children should reach by 18 months old.

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Communication

Milestone

Key Milestones

By 15 Months:

  • May use 5-10 words
  • Combines sounds and gestures
  • Imitates simple words and actions
  • Consistently follows simple directions
  • Shows interest in pictures
  • Can identify 1-2 body parts when named
  • Understands 50 words

By 18 Months:

  • Responds to questions
  • Continues to produce speech-like babbling
  • Points at familiar objects and people in pictures
  • Understands “in” and “on”
  • Responds to yes/no questions with head shake/nod
  • Repeats words overheard in conversation
Act early by talking to your healthcare provider if your child:
  • Doesn’t babble
  • Doesn’t hold eye contact
  • Doesn’t respond when name is called
  • Doesn’t make any attempts to communicate

13 to 18 Month Old - Communication Milestones to Look For

The 13-18 month communication milestones video shows parents and caregivers examples of communication milestones children should reach by 18 months old.

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Feeding

Milestone

Key Milestones

  • Increases variety of coarsely chopped table foods
  • Holds and drinks from a cup
Baby is fully walking and exploring everything at this age, including food! They should be able to eat most of the same foods as adults after 12 months and more easily use utensils.

13 to 18 Month Old - Feeding Milestones to Look For

The 13-18 month feeding milestones video shows parents and caregivers examples of feeding milestones children should reach by 18 months old.

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Play and Social Skills

Ability

Key Abilities

  • Is interested in interacting with people (plays patty cake)
  • Raises hands to be picked up
  • Maintains eye contact with people during playful interactions
  • Is interested in imitating others
  • Turns head in response to name being called
  • Points to objects of interest by 12 months
  • Is able to locate objects you are pointing to
  • Claps hand together in response to social play
  • Enjoys playing with a variety of toys and textures
  • Enjoys banging and playing with musical toys
  • Enjoys playing with new toys
  • Eagerly explores the environment when placed on the floor
  • Enjoys being swung and gently thrown in air
  • Enjoys exploring and playing at the playground
  • Enjoys swinging on playground swings

Coordination

Ability

Key Abilities

  • Is frequently moving in and out of various positions (e.g. crawling, climbing, cruising, and walking) to explore and get desirable objects
  • Maintains balance in sitting or standing while using two hands together to explore toys
  • Is able to turn head to look at objects without losing balance while standing
  • Is able to take steps toward motivating item
  • Crawls or walks to get desired item
  • Has adequate endurance and strength to play with peers
  • Uses hands to help move from one position to another
  • Is able to throw balls without losing balance
  • Uses both hands equally to play with and explore toys
  • Seeks out various new ways to move and play

Daily Activities

Ability

Key Abilities

  • Usually enjoys bath time
  • Is able to self calm in car rides when not tired or hungry
  • Usually tolerates diaper changes without crying
  • Is able to tip head back when moving from sitting to back
  • Is able to use fingertips to pick up small objects, such as small pieces of food
  • Eats an increasing variety of food
  • Can usually participate in dressing without becoming upset
  • Has an established sleep schedule
  • Is usually able to calm self to fall asleep
  • Is able to tolerate and wear new and varied textures of clothing

Self-Expression

Ability

Key Abilities

  • Is comforted by cuddling and a parent’s touch
  • Is generally happy when not hungry or tired
  • Is able to calm with experiences such as rocking, touch, and soothing sounds
  • Has grown accustomed to everyday sounds and is usually not startled by them
  • Has an established and reliable sleeping schedule
  • Is able to enjoy a wide variety of touch, noise, and smells
  • Cries and notices when hurt
  • Is able to self soothe when upset
  • Enjoys various textures, such as grass or sand, after multiple exposures
  • Is able to transition to new environment or activity
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